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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Oct 20, 2013 10:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's in a name? 'The Grateful Dead'

Hey Tell, you got me curious. Who did Ed Abbey consider to be artists then?

Speaking of entertainers, I just happened to be channel surfing just now and ran into a recent Gregg Allman concert and he was doing an impassioned version of a Jackson Browne song "These Days." Who would have thunk?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 20, 2013 12:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's in a name? 'The Grateful Dead'

Yeah, Abbey was a real sexist blowhard, but he articulated some excellent "positions" that someone "needed to" (if you follow; like blowing up Glen Cyn Dam, closing the border, etc., etc.), even if you disagree with a lot of the polarization that it typified...

Of course, as a eco/conservation/bio prof, I have taught classes with Desert Solitaire and MWGang and so on as texts for yrs, but only recently re-read and got into his journals and all the books that have come out the past decade that allow one to see DEEP behind the curtain, blah, blah, blah.

I think a lot of his comments like the ones I allude to were just to stir things up (like what I do around here, eh? har, har). But, he clearly didn't listen to 60s/pop/etc, though he LOVED music (all classical, all the time; plus, anything "roots Americana", etc., etc.).

I do think that his position causes one to think about the distinction, on the continuum I suppose, from pure fluff, entertainers to pure, unpopular, iconoclastic artist, eh?

I would imagine he'd say that Michael Jackson was NO artist, but a great entertainer? YOu can take it from there w that line of reasoning I suppose...

Ha! That's funny about "These Days" (used to love that tune...the dark and moody JB, eh?! His early albums were just great, ya know? Loved seeing him with Linda [bless her whale size body--I am catching up her too!] Ronstadt in 74 & 75...great, great shows.

Entertainers more than artists, I suppose? Dunno--but I had a huge crush on Linda!

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 28, 2013 5:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: speaking of Abbey ...

... turns out that's what my son's class is reading in high school. From Desert Solitaire, not Monkeywrench Gang. (Or Abbey's journals.) Although MWGang would make an interesting hands-on field experience. Did you do labs with it? Or has the statute of limitations not run out?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 30, 2013 4:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: speaking of Abbey ...

No labs; just allude to him regularly, and have some assigned readings, etc. I figure that any kid growing up in the Southwest should know the name, and they used to...nowadays, when I ask if ANY of them have heard of him, I can get a big fat "huh?"...that's a shock.

So, I ease them into it if it's a class with no Assignments of ED; let them watch Lonely are the Brave, etc. They always love him...John Nichols as well; the Blow Hard and his Bean Field Friend, a real pair if ever there was...

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Oct 20, 2013 4:45pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's in a name? 'The Grateful Dead'

"I would imagine he'd say that Michael Jackson was NO artist, but a great entertainer? YOu can take it from there w that line of reasoning I suppose..."

And I would agree with him. I think part of the artist bit for me has to do with creating. So for music, writing most if not all your material.

I saw JB many times (I'm an LA dude). The first was in the early 70s when he opened for Joni Mitchell. I knew he would be huge - the girls just squirmed. He was similar to Jerry in that he just hated tuning - couldn't do - chatted constantly while trying. I remember him complaining about being a solo act and telling us that he wouldn't be doing this again - too stressful. Next time I saw him a few months later he introduced a close friend of his who would be helping him out - David Lindley. God he was amazing.

I saw Linda bunches too - first time when the Stone Poneys opened for Van Morrison. I refuse to have in mind a Linda Ronstadt with a whale-size body. Just refuse. :) And it makes me very sad that she can't even sing Happy Birthday anymore.

So much for Sunday afternoon reminiscing.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 20, 2013 8:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's in a name? 'The Grateful Dead'

Ed Abbey? Darryl Cherney and Dana Lyons, I guess :-)

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Poster: William Tell Date: Oct 21, 2013 11:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's in a name? 'The Grateful Dead'

Ha! Those are obscure...good ones!

;)

[the folks hereabouts that thought I was a drooling sexist should really take a look at Abbey; his journal is worse than my diary as a 14 yr old FROSH...jeeezzz!!]

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 22, 2013 2:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's in a name? 'The Grateful Dead'

Well, he was born in 1927. Same generation as Kerouac/Neal Cassady etc. For a lot of those guys it was part of being anti-status quo and radical and all. Epater la bourgeoisie. I don't suppose he ever got his consciousness raised, though.

I can't remember whether it was Abbey or Dave Foreman who, when asked by a rather more p.c. group of eco-folks how he could EVER be an environmentalist and still eat MEAT, he replied, "I'm trying to get rid of the cattle on public land by eating them all."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPhWfSeMYHA